Hatchie

Q&A

Music | September 5 2017

Introducing Harriette and her similitude-nay-creative persona, Hatchie. They are the same person, but—as delightfully articulated below—concurrently and harmoniously branch into different waves of force, opportunity dependent. On the back of a bombastic premier release – ‘Try’ in May this year, it’s obvious this impassioned pop singer / creative tour-de-force is just beginning to pave her artistic-path. I spoke with Harriette about her creative process, her dream-future for female artists and; how best to aurally resuscitate a flagging house party. Hint: the 70s, as always, is her answer.

Your name is Harriette and in the music world, you go by Hatchie. Can you please introduce us to her?

Hatchie is a culmination of everything I’ve wanted to do musically for the last few years—she has a lot more confidence and creativity than Harriette does.  I’m quite a shy person so Hatchie gives me a chance to put all my feelings and energy into a project so I don’t feel senseless keeping it all inside.

Your music has been described as shoegaze-y with a dream pop edge (which I love!) Can you please share a little about your sound?

I guess, when I started getting into that kind of music a few years ago, it was such a great feeling of relief. Relief, in that there was a whole world of sound that I could dive into, not only as a listener but also a writer. When I wrote songs as a teenager it often bummed me out, because they would turn into these wishy-washy pop songs I wasn’t really proud of or excited to play. I started experimenting—with some help—more with guitars and synths maybe two years ago and thought it would be cool to leave the vocals and melodies in my songs as super pop. I’m still finding my feet and figuring out which direction to take my sound – which is really exciting to me.

“It's so important to give female identifying artists a platform to be seen and heard, just as male artists are constantly given. There are just as many—if not more—talented non-male and non-cisgender artists who deserve the same opportunities and praise... I think it's due time larger organisations; festivals, radio stations and print media cooperatives stepped up and did more to be inclusive every day of the year, not just when there's a hashtag involved...”

Your rise to fame seems like a bit of a whirlwind experience—‘Try’ is your first release and it’s mad! Can you tell us a little bit about the journey so far?

Thank you! It’s been pretty weird – I definitely didn’t expect the response I’ve had. I just played my first show, which was awesome. I decided I wanted to try doing my own project maybe two years ago, around when I wrote ‘Try.’ It was the first song that really made me believe I had a shot and reason to do my own project. I’m very grateful that people even want to hear one song, let alone a whole live set or record.

You’ve been in oodles (sic) of bands and now you’re flying solo. How do these past experiences inform your current creative process?

I couldn’t have gotten Hatchie on the right track if I didn’t have the knowledge and experience gained after playing in bands for a few years. Creatively, Hatchie is very different from my previous projects, so the recording process isn’t the same, but it’s taught me a world of knowledge about writing and playing live. I’ve really learnt to put my deeply personal feelings out there as a creative response to working with other writers who have done so. I couldn’t have done that a few years ago when I was just starting out. Live shows still freak me out a bit, so I’m glad I’ve had lots of practice for those and have some problem solving tricks up my sleeve!

What inspires your energetic style of art? Where do you look to for the drive to create and refine your practice?

I guess it’s a mixture of a love for pop writing and 80s post punk and shoegaze production. I’ve been waiting and preparing for this for years, so I hope it will be a while before I run out of energy and inspiration! My boyfriend and many of my friends are musicians and creatives, so inspiring people surround me most of the time—they drive me.

In your opinion, what does your dream-future look like for female/female identifying artists? And what can we—the public—do to help you?

It’s so important to give female identifying artists a platform to be seen and heard, just as male artists are constantly given. There are just as many—if not more—talented non-male and non-cisgender artists who deserve the same opportunities and praise.

Publications and pages such as The Ladies Network are doing great things to help shift this gaze. I think it’s due time larger organisations; festivals, radio stations and print media cooperatives stepped up and did more to be inclusive every day of the year, not just when there’s a hashtag involved, such as International Women’s Day.

You get an ish–hour on the music at a restless house party. What do you play to reignite the fever?

I’d probably put on some 70s soul and funk – always keeps the party going at kick-ons!


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