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Art | October 13 2016

Jordyn McGeachin

Where do you live?

Melbourne, Australia.

When did you first start making art?

I’ve been drawing forever but I’ve only really been making art consistently over the last 3 years.

How would you describe your art?

I’d say my art is soft, playful, a little erotic.

Why do you think female collectives are important?

I think they’re important because with them comes this kind of unspoken supportive, non-competitive community.

There’s still sexism everywhere; it’s taken the art world a long time to cut down on it so it’s just real cool to see a range of artists making exciting and different things. It’s not an exclusive thing; women, queer, non-binary artists have been shoved into their own box when it comes to artistic practises so it’s empowering to see such a strong, inspiring collective of artists continue to break through and create.

What are you working on right now?

I’m slowly trying to make a new body of work mainly based around ‘modern’ dating/sex.

Elle-Louize Burguez

Where do you live?

I’ve been living all over the place this year- France, Maroc, Spain and currently Mauritius. But I’m back to my beautiful home on the Sunshine Coast next week!

When did you first start making art?

I first started making this style of art a few years ago. But creating things has always been apart of my life. It’s necessary for my soul.. So I can sort of eschew and release the feelings of being stuck and fearful all the time.

So I could say when I was a little Bub painting with my fingers or making the fairies in my garden flower sandwiches was where it all began. We are all making art in some way.

How would you describe your art?

Hmm this is a tough question for me because when I start trying to analyse it I feel like I’m being pretentious or trying to make it seem more wonderful or interesting than it actually is ha!

For me, whilst I’m painting, I am spellbound to a place that my brain is creating for me in that moment. Through colours and shapes, the feeling of mixing paint, the scents I imagine and the emotions…

I think I’ve realised that perhaps I create these little worlds without people because when there are humans involved that’s where it gets complicated. The spaces are purely for a unique feeling that you engross yourself in. One that isn’t distorted by another’s view or another’s presence. But who knows if that’s even accurate haha I’ll change my mind in a minute.

Why do you think female collectives are important?

To me women are abundant with love and strength. We are almost bursting with it and need to use it for good. What makes this power so beautiful is when we work together, support each other and trust one another. No more petty envy and competitiveness! Let’s bring each other up ladies!

What are you working on right now?

Right now I have been taking a break from painting. Sometimes I can get intense and too excited and just paint, paint, paint. I need some calm and time to reflect on my year and what it is that I can do to empower myself and to feel a deep sense of truth. I know that when I get home I will collect some big canvases, mix some rich earthy coloured paints and get my hands dirty. For the love of it and not the ego kisses!

Ondine Seabrook

Where do you live?

I live in Newtown (the south end.) I also basically live at The National Art school but will be moving out soon.

When did you first start making art?

I started making art when I was a young kid as all people generally do then progressively became more and more interested and became fully hooked and never stopped.

How would you describe your art?

My work is a vague representation of the Australian landscape. Except sometimes you can’t even tell its a landscape because it’s become abstract as I’ve spent too long in my studio in the city. It’s not deep and conceptual. It is colourful with gestural marks and wonky shapes. I try and offer up a fun lighthearted feel with a bit of seriousness. I paint from memories or little loose paintings I have done in landscape rather than photographs to get a more open, less objective view.

Spontaneous process plays a strong role in my work, I never really completely plan out what I am doing one thing just leads to another, its way more exciting this way and the work just sort of magically evolves in front of you.

Why do you think female collectives are important?

Because females are awesome. So are men but when you get a bunch of females together different things just happen you know. I think its nice to embrace the qualities that make you a woman in a positive way.

What are you working on right now?

I went to the central Australian Desert and back a couple of months ago for the first time which was insane so I am painting from that trip. These works are all for the grad show at The National Art School which opens on the 1st of December.

Lizzi Morris

Where do you live?

I live in Melbourne, Australia.

When did you first start making art?

I’ve always been interested in art, and I’ve probably been drawing since I could hold a pencil. But it’s only been in the last six years or so that I’ve actually focused on making art, and developed an interdisciplinary practice that includes installation and textiles as well as drawing.

How would you describe your art?

My art is an investigation into contrasting soft and hard objects that are reliant on one another. The objects are examined through both physical, site-responsive installation and drawing –  which can act as either documentation or as a mode of developing ideas for potential objects and installations.

Focussing on the material, it further considers a physical approach to objects, where it looks at the handmade and the tactile experience or encounter between the body, installation and object.

Why do you think female collectives are important?

I feel like inclusive collectives that act as a safe space for personal expression are essential so that we have the opportunity to support, celebrate and uplift others. We can then engage with and listen to important discussions surrounding gender and further inequalities that marginalised groups experience.

What are you working on right now?

At the moment I’m finishing up the final month of my honours degree at university! But in my spare time I’m trying to teach myself how to sew garments.

Helen Proctor

Where do you live?

Redfern, Sydney

When did you first start making art?

I’ve always been the arty kid. Ive been making art in one form or another for as long as I remember.

How would you describe your art?

I’m working on more abstract landscape paintings at the moment. I think there is still an influence of my street art background in the aesthetic.

Why do you think female collectives are important?

I think it allows for an encouraging environment. The art scene is still male dominated and revolves around being able to sell yourself, personally I’m not very good at that so it helps to have others promote and support my practice. Its also inspiring to see how many creative and amazing women are out there doing their thing. #girlpower

What are you working on right now?
I just had my second solo show ‘Twilight Driving’, it was a reflection on a residency I did down at the Snowy Mountains. I’m about to have a stall at The Other Art Fair in Sydney. Then I’m off to Europe for some travel time and hopefully to paint a couple of walls.

Anne Barlinckhoff

Where do you live?

At the moment between Amsterdam, Valencia and Africa.

When did you first start making art?

As a child, everything is art.

How would you describe your art

With my work I can create my own paradise. It’s an escape and confrontation at the same time. Which can create a dreaming state in which peace and beauty are synonymous with happiness.

Why do you think female collectives are important?

Women are everything, we often make decisions based on emotions and feelings. Which I think is a beautiful and honest way of living.

What are you working on right now?

Very soon I’ll be going to Ghana and the Ivory Coast to explore and capture the cacao industry, culture, nature and people.

Shop the artists works here


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